Collecting Vintage Board Games

When it comes to the best past-times both for kids and adults, board games take quite a huge slice of the cake. Game boards are definitely one of the most enjoyable past-times. Aside from entertaining people, this type of game also help build knowledge and values. You see, unlike the digital games of today, board related games stimulate the mind more, enhancing one’s logic and decision-making skills regardless of one’s age. There are also other benefits to playing game boards. The most important skills it teaches, ones that video games cannot teach, are communication and social skills. Moreover, here are some examples of what you can learn from board games:

• Board games enhance one’s intellect. Unlike with the digital games of today, with classic board toy games, you really have to use your brain constantly in order to win. Some of it do employ the element of luck in the game play, but you still need to strategize to win;

• It develop certain skill sets. Depending on what game you play, vintage board games can help you develop your skills. Here are some examples:

o Scrabble can help you improve your vocabulary;
o Monopoly can help you hone your money-handling skills;
o Clue can help you hone your deductive reasoning and logic;

• This type of game help social units bond. Unlike with modern games where you play alone, or if you do play with others, you only play over a digital network, board games often require you to play with other people, in person. You can invite family members, friends or workmates to play with you, and in the end, help you to becoming a more solid unit as you bond over a game or two.

As you can see, playing vintage board games can be quite educational. Plus, doing so can help you develop other skills aside from intellect. It is sad that these types of games are no longer as popular as they were in the past. Fortunately, people still have the opportunity to own a piece of the past. One can collect vintage board games easily. You just have to know where to look. Moreover, there are many enthusiasts who collect and sell old board games.

So why collect vintage board games? Aside from having a set of fun educational materials ready and on hand, there are also other benefits to collecting game boards. As mentioned above, collectors can sell their game boards when they become in demand. If a board toy game you own becomes a collector’s item, owning it would be like having an investment. The rarer an item gets, the more money you can sell it for. If you get lucky, you may be able to sell your rare board games to other collectors for double the price, or even more!

There are other ways of profiting from a collection of vintage board games. As long as you take care of your collection and keep it in good shape, you should be able to make a good amount of money from it in due time. To know more about this hobby and how to profit from collecting game boards, read up on the topic. Find a good resource that can help you be familiar with the dos and don’ts of this hobby.

TV Shows and Board Games

It can be safely said that television plays a very large role in culture today. It is extremely rare to find someone who doesn’t pay attention to the programming on the networks today. This attention starts to bleed out into other forms of entertainment available to the public and this includes the world of board games. Popular television shows are beginning to find some life in the gaming industry and this is a fact that is unlikely to change anytime soon. Fans are becoming more and more outspoken about exactly what they like and when options are available to them to continue to enjoy their interests, especially in the world of board games, they will take them.

A number of popular television shows have been given a platform with board games in the form of trivia. Grey’s Anatomy, Sex and the City, I Love Lucy, and Desperate Housewives are just a few of the shows which have been given this trivia game treatment. With these board games, players often compete with each other in questions about the show’s storyline, the actors in the show, and production behind it. Fans who know the most, usually with some lucky throws of the dice, find themselves as the winner of the game. These games feature a simple board that players race around, landing on different spaces that usually denote the type of question that needs to be answered to progress. Trivia games based on popular television shows are usually popular with the fans because not only does it allow them to prove their status as super fans, but to usually learn something new about the show that they did not realize before.

Trivia games aren’t the only representation that television shows have in the board game world, however. Different shows are adaptable to different types of games, such as reality television. Some of these reality game shows have been adapted into board games, with Survivor, Big Brother, and The Amazing Race being some of the most popular ones. With Survivor, players race around the board for Immunity by solving different puzzles or trivia questions about survival skills. The first player to reach the end of the board wins the round and Immunity for that turn. Players will then vote one member of the game out of the running and onto the jury. Players who have previously been voted out return at the end of the game to determine the winner between the final two players, much like the show. The Amazing Race board game utilizes a DVD which allows players to experience some of the different cultures of the world while racing through the board, giving it an edge that other board games usually do not provide.

Lost gives its fans a strategy board game that changes each time it is played. By laying different tiles across the playing field, the board is built randomly each game and “the island” is never quite the same twice. It allows players to have a variety of different characters from the show and the novelty of this can last quite a while. Television can be a very creative outlet for storytelling and adventure and when these quality cross over into the board games representing the shows, quality entertainment can be enjoyed by all.

Power Grid Board Game Review

In Power Grid, a new power market has opened up and everything is up for grabs. Compete against other power suppliers as you work your way towards becoming the biggest power supplier in the land. Build power plants and control the market for raw materials such as garbage, oil, coal and uranium. Connect cities to your power grid before others do and become the greatest power magnate!

Power Grid is a strategy board game designed by Friedemann Friese and is a remake of the German board game Funkenschlag. Each player represents a power supply company trying to connect as many cities as possible to its power grid. To do so, you will have to build power plants to supply enough electricity to power your cities; own enough resources to run the power plants; and earn enough funds to connect the cities and buy the power plants and resources.

Each game of Power Grid is played on a board featuring a map of a region hungry for power. The base game comes with 2 maps: the USA and Germany. Each map shows the cities that can be connected to your power grid and the connection fees between the cities. For example, it is cheaper to connect Washington with nearby Philadelphia than it is to connect San Francisco to Seattle. The board also contains a grid showing the raw materials (coal, oil, garbage and uranium), how much is available and how much they cost.

There are 4 actions each round in your quest to power the most cities (the game ends when a player connects a certain number of cities, determined by the number of players). Firstly, players take turns to bid for power plants. These plants can be powered by materials such as oil, coal, garbage, uranium and wind. Each power plant also has different efficiencies (being able to power a different number of cities), but you pay for that efficiency by spending more to buy the more efficient power plants.

There is an order to the bidding process. The player with the most connected cities each round get to bid for power plants first. However, this is balanced by the fact that they will be the last to buy raw materials and connect cities. Buying raw materials involves grabbing coal, oil, garbage or uranium from the board at their current price. There is a raw materials market that changes depending on supply and demand. The materials replenish at a fixed rate each turn, and are consumed by players using the related power plants. The more of each material is available, the cheaper it is.

Connecting cities involves paying connection fees and placing your tokens on the connected cities. There are clusters of cities on each board where the connection fees are pretty cheap, but building in those areas means competing against more players who also want to take advantage of the cheap connections. Power Grid also divides the game into 3 phases: starting, growing and matured phases. Progressing from one phase to the next changes the amount of raw materials that are replenished each round, and also increases the number of players who can connect to each city.

The last action in the round is to power your cities. You use up the required raw materials and earn cash depending on how many cities you powered. You can then use this cash to buy more power plants and resources, and connect more cities the next round.

Power Grid is mainly about efficiency and strategic planning. The goal is to power as many cities as you can, and the player who is the most efficient and can do it the fastest will win. Also, how much are you willing to bid for that attractive power plant? Should you spend your limited funds connecting choice cities first or overbidding for that new power plant? Is it worth it to spend a bit more to connect to distant cities in order to cut other players off from a city network? Should you target cities in cheap but congested networks or go for the isolated expensive ones? These are questions you need to always keep in mind, and the answers will change depending on how your opponents play as well.

The game also has expansion boards and power plant sets. New boards include France, Central Europe, China and Korea, and each introduces interesting aspects to the game. For example, the order in which power plants are revealed in the China game reflect’s the country’s planned economy. Similarly, there are 2 resource markets in Korea to reflect the separate North and South economies, and the North Korea resource market doesn’t have uranium (right…).

Overall, Power Grid isn’t too challenging a game to learn. The mechanics are pretty straightforward and easily grasped, though it might take time to master the efficiency and fund-allocation required to be really good at it. The game takes just over 2 hours, and is one of few games that can play up to 6 players without losing its appeal or taking too long.

Complexity: 3.5/5.0

Playing Time: 2.0 to 2.5 hours

Number of Players: 2 to 6 players